Martial Development

Martial arts for personal development

Entries from November 2007

An Enlightened Cartoon For Your Enjoyment

November 28th, 2007 · No Comments

An enlightened cartoon for your enjoyment

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Reduce Karmic Debts up to 60% with Karma Consolidation

November 28th, 2007 · 1 Comment


Photo Credit: Arnþór Snær

Stop Paying For A Past Life!

By consolidating your bad karma you can reduce your karmic debt up to 60%. This means by paying off your bad karma in one or two short misadventures you can avoid paying for a bad mistake for the rest of your life little by little. By getting what you deserve all at once it is possible to show the universe you are aware you are a bad person, and we can help by convincing the universe to go easy on you. Even if you haven’t learned your lesson we can trick the powers that be into thinking you have. [Read more →]

Bullying and Harassment Prevention Tips

November 25th, 2007 · 9 Comments

Two weeks ago, I asked Martial Development readers to share their bullying and harassment stories. Here are the responses:

Of Brick Walls and Petty Tyrants by Karen Shanley
How I helped my daughter deal with a difficult teacher.

How to Deal with an Office Bully by The Career Counselor
…I really need to keep this job but I’m dreading going to work everyday because she is so mean. What should I do? [Read more →]

How Amateur Bloggers Create Great Posts

November 23rd, 2007 · 13 Comments

While thumbing through the letters to the editor in one of my favorite magazines, I made a troubling observation. Nobody seemed to congratulate the authors on a job well done, or expressed appreciation for all their hard work.

Some letters highlighted an important point that the author missed, while others had the temerity to disagree with the author’s conclusion. How very rude, I thought!

USa Today

Indignant, I perused the other newsstand periodicals for validation of my feelings. I found none. From obscure technical journals to USA Today, every professionally edited publication followed the same pattern.

Rather than showing gratitude for tight prose and well-researched reporting, readers seemed to expect them; and they spoke up only when writers failed to meet this high standard.

Walking away from the kiosk, I realized that I was judging these professional authors by the standards of an amateur blogger. Anyone who aspires to creating high-quality content and a respectable audience, through a blog or any other medium, should appreciate the difference. [Read more →]

Three Embarrassing Personal Confessions

November 21st, 2007 · 14 Comments

Confessional
Photo Credit: Bene16

As a busy software developer and martial art hobbyist, I rarely have enough time to entertain the proposals, projects and invitations I receive from fellow bloggers.

Of the time I can spare, I have dedicated a good percentage to outspoken criticism of martial arts excesses, leading some traditionalists to ask why I bother at all.

Today, I shall kill two birds with one stone: I am starting a meme dedicated to taking myself down a notch. [Read more →]

Energy Medicine Becomes Front-Page News

November 18th, 2007 · 4 Comments

Last year, I predicted that Qi Gong and energy medicine therapies would become big business over the next decade, possibly eclipsing both Yoga and the UFC combined.  I also predicted an increase in qigong fraud, where inadequately trained therapists operate expensive, ineffectual energy devices on desperate patients.

Sorry to say, I was right. [Read more →]

Catching an Arrow in Flight: Real Skill or Ninja Myth?

November 17th, 2007 · 39 Comments

Midori Tanaka

Japan’s ninja spies were rumored to possess extraordinary powers of mind and body. By some accounts, ninja could jump twenty feet in the air, walk on water, or even disappear.

Last March, Discovery Channel’s Mythbusters decided to put a few of these legendary supernatural skills to the test, with carefully designed scientific experiments. The following images show their results. [Read more →]

Ninja Parade Slips Through Town Unnoticed

November 17th, 2007 · 3 Comments

From The Onion News Network:

Ninja Parade Slips Through Town Unnoticed Once Again

Ninja parade

In Modesto, California today, crowds turned out for the annual Modesto County Ninja Parade, which once again passed through the town entirely undetected. [Read more →]

Li Ching-Yuen, The Amazing 250 Year-Old Man

November 17th, 2007 · 123 Comments

When the Chinese herbalist Li Ching-Yuen died in 1933, newspapers around the world reported the news of his passing. According to his own testimony, he was 197 years old.

An investigation, however, suggested Li had forgotten his actual birthday. Official government records recorded the birth year as 1677, making him 256. Here is a copy of the obituary as printed in the New York Times on May 6, 1933:

LI CHING-YUN DEAD; GAVE HIS AGE AS 197.

“Keep a Quiet Heart, Sit Like a Tortoise, Sleep Like a Dog,” His Advice for a Long Life.

Li Ching-Yuen
Li Ching-Yuen

Inquiry Put Age At 256.

Reported to have buried 23 wives and had 180 descendents – sold herbs for first 100 years.

Peiping, May 5 – Li Ching-Yun, a resident of Kaihsien, in the Province of Szechwan, who contended that he was one of the world’s oldest men and said he was born in 1736 – which would make him 197 years old – died today.

A Chinese dispatch from Chungking telling of Mr. Li’s death said he attributed his longevity to peace of mind and that it was his belief every one could live at least a century by attaining inward calm. [Read more →]

Get a Tucking Clue: Tai Chi and Your Tailbone

November 16th, 2007 · 6 Comments

Practiced properly, Tai Chi is among the most beneficial activities for improving one’s health. Unfortunately, some students misunderstand one fundamental alignment principle, resulting in collapsed and contorted postures that are more likely to injure health than restore it. The principle: tucking the tailbone.

A straightened spine is required for most Tai Chi postures, and the proper way to accomplish this is explained the Tai Chi classics. The top end of the spine should be lifted, from the head; the bottom end of the spine should be relaxed and allowed to drop.

Over time, the combined forces of intentional expansion and natural contraction (supplied by gravity) will pull the spine taut, as if suspended in the air. The musculature will automatically adjust to support this straightening—unless it is prevented from doing so. [Read more →]